GTPD K9 Training App

Duration: ​Jan-May 2016
My Role: UX Design, Research & Visual Design
Skills: User Interviews, Contextual Inquiries, Need Identification, Interaction Flow, Product Conceptualization, Wireframing, Visual Design, Low & High-Level Prototyping
Teammate: ​​​Andy Ybarra, Cameron Smith, Clayton Feustel, Hyun Seo Chung, Jake Griffith 

Summary

Training in the K9 unit requires a considerable amount of record keeping on the part of the trainer. For each training scenario, a dog is put in, the trainer must create a new document and manually record multiple fields of information regarding the scenario's initial conditions and how the dog performed. This document is then put in a binder with all previous sessions, which is used as a record for a dog's performance. In addition to the simple physical demand of repetitively entering fixed data fields, such a system has obvious negative effects on an officer's ability to distil important trends in the data over time.

     
To address these shortcomings, we created an Android application to allow officers to create digital training records in the field. In order to ease the workload of the trainer, we passively collect many of the data points previously requiring manual entry. To complement the training, we developed a provision for observing usage trends of particular aids and average find times for the different explosives.   

Design Process

     
We followed the double diamond approach of design process which included diverging and converging with various design ideas and eventually delivering the project deliverable.
    
 

User Research


  • Around 5 interviews were conducted with current officers of the Georgia Tech Police Department to know about training and record keeping of the K9 dogs. These interviews helped us in understanding the nitty-gritty of manual record keeping, the training process and the existing frustrations. 

  • Along with interviews, 2 contextual inquiries were conducted where we observed a live K9 training in progress using the traditional pen and paper methods. This helped us develop a better understanding of the roles of a dog handler and a K9 trainer.

Observations and Pain Points

Training in the K9 unit requires a considerable amount of record keeping on the part of the trainer.

  • For each training scenario, a dog is put in, the trainer must create a new document and manually record multiple fields of information regarding the scenario's initial conditions and how the dog performed.
  • This document is then put in a binder with all previous sessions, which is used as a record for a dog's performance.
  • In addition to the simple physical demand of repetitively entering fixed data fields, such a system has obvious negative effects on an officer's ability to distil important trends in the data over time. Discovering these trends is important, however.

User Task Flow

Selected Wireframes 

Information Architecture

Selected Hi-Fidelity Screens